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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this conflict has gone, the worse it has gotten. all of those who argued for non intervention because of the things tha
now!" >> there is this long standing relationship, should give us pause about the people we support today because we don't know what sort of consequences we may be engineering tomorrow. >> we speak with matthieu aikins who is just returned from two months in pakistan, examining what led to the capture and killing of osama bin laden. his piece is called, "the doctor, the cia, and the blood of bin laden." that is the african national congress in south africa votes to support a boycott divestment and sanctions, we look at a new film "road map to apartheid." >> i have been able to visit israel and palestine on more than two occasions. and what i experienced there was such a cruel reminder of a at a painful to protest south africa. we were largely controlled in the same way. >> we will speak with the israeli and south african born co-director of the film, then reverend billy on the end of the world. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. people across the united states are expected to join a moment of silence
were their sort of elements where we agree and hing,f t that will help us understand g in iraq or afghanistan or other conflicts, think if you want a of the viet nam war it is worth the to work like this that will help triet .. .. this is just under an hour. [applause] shalom, good evening, everybody. it's my pleasure to be with uiq. i'm very happy to see so many people coming here and showing an interest in my boat i would like in the next 20 minutes to show we do not want this in the book, but behind the idea. we can all agree with happening in israel is important to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. because we are in the middle east today, dean attacked we ask ourselves why these people against the jewish nation in the middle east. not because of the lens we so-called occupied. it is the value we are working upon them in israel and the values of our democracy following very carefully their election he
korea telex its first female president. she has pledged to help the ailing economy. >>> u.s. president barack obama says he wants concrete proposals on gun control presented to him by the end of next month. >> after the school shooting and connecticut, president obama said he was prepared to put the full weight of his office behind this issue. we now know how he plans to do that. these are the victims, three more children buried in newtown, conn., today, a teacher who tried to save them laid to rest as well. now politicians are talking about how to prevent another mass killing of children in their classrooms. >> we have a deep obligation, all of us, to try. >> not president obama has put vice president joe biden in charge, saying that he will outline his proposals next month. >> the good news is there is a growing consensus to build on, with a majority of support banning the sale of military- style assault weapons, a majority support the ammunition clips. that the president says that gun-control legislation will be part of it, but he is not saying, and nobody asked, if he is considerin
in u.s. history. president obama defeated mitt romney forcing the republicans to reconsider their policies among others returning women and immigrants. while the major party presidential candidate did not take on fossil fuel, climate change in any of their debates, it was a year of extrem e weathr from melting of the arctic to superstorm sandy to the massive typhoon in the philippines. 2012 will also be remembered for a series of mass shootings from aurora, arata, to the sikh temple, to be shooting in newtown, conn.. the case around trayvon martin sparked national protest after officials refused to arrest george zimmerman. president obama continues his secret drone wars. we spend the hour looking back at the moment and movements that shaped 2012. >> democratic congresswoman gabrielle giffords has announced she will step down this week. she was shot in the head last year in a shooting spree that left six people dead in tucson. >> thank you for your prayers and for giving me the time to recover. i have more work to do on my recovery, so i will do what is best for arizona. i wi
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder, experience the rapes, those are routine. iranian officials are involved in that activity but also in massive corruption preventing humanitarian assistance, food and medicine from reaching the iranian people, they are the beneficiaries of some of this and this new amendment would authorize the administration
>> at the country, our best years are still ahead of us. mr. president for my will and my remarks today where our country began a long time ago. with the dream and a pair that god will continue to bless the united states of america. >> tomorrow night, watch the farewell speech by republican senator dick lugar and democratic representative lynn woolsey of california. we will also show you a tribute in the u.s. house to outgoing caliber and california members of cameras.. join us at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. later a look at the dodd-frank law and regulations. >> this is c-span3 with politics and public affairs programming throughout the week. and every weekend, 40 hours a people and events ,-com,-com ma telling the american story on american history tv. get schedules in the past programs our website. you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> tomorrow a draft constitution by mohammed morsi. it would expand his constitutional powers. supporters and opponents of president mohammed morsi. next, we'll talk about developments in the country and security throughout the
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
with some sad news today. a u.s. navy seal killed during the daring rescue of an american held captive in the heart of afghanistan. good morning i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. when we talk about the american captive, we have a picture of the doctor whose live was saved. he is dylan joseph, a native colorado. he was in afghanistan for humanitarian work when i was kidnapped by the taliban in a province east of kabul. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at pentagon with more. jen, do we have any details on the american who gave his life to save this doctor? >> reporter: they're waiting to contact the family so the military does not release the identity of the seal killed in that rescue attempt. we know he was a member of "seal team 6". not necessarily a member of the same group that carried out the usama bin laden raid. there are about 200 members of "seal team 6". this man, as you said, gave his life for his fellow american. here is a statement that was read by the spokesman for isaf today. >> it has been decided to start the operations since the assessment the
and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark of night, to find out what was going on, on the other side of the river, and he and his three companions, i
of us who had the privilege to serve with you. i hope and i pray that god will give you and your wife many, many more years of life and enjoyment because you have certainly earned it, because you have served not only the united states house of representatives, but you have served us, you have served the people of our districts as well as helping us be better members of congress. so with that i will close by asking god to please bless you and your family and may god continue to bless the house of representatives and jay pearson, you will be in our hearts until the day we die. god bless you. . mr. woodall: at this time, it's migrate pleasure to yield the gentleman from california, chairman of the ways and means health subcommittee, mr. herger. mr. herger: i thank my good friend. how wonderful it is to be able to sit here and listen to all these incredibly warm remarks from people who, like myself, know and love jay pearson. and there's a reason for that. jay, you're one of the best of the best. and i think, it's hard to believe that 26 years comes and goes so very, very quickly, but it
-handed pitch, a college baseball player and two of her granddaughters that worked for me as a page, for us as a page, rebecca and holly. when she's not at the desk -- and she spends long hours there -- mr. president, i don't go home early. i could call, she would be there, 9:00, 10:00 at night and that is no exaggeration. but she's not at that desk, janice was usually in georgia or north carolina with her children or grandchildren. now, she has probably been really political but i think she's gotten a little more political working for me. she's made sure each of her grandchildren makes sure they understand the importance of their political voice. during the recent election she called those eligible to vote to make sure they'd voted. and i didn't press very hard but she may have urged them how they should vote. while janice's accomplishments deserve recognition, it is janice herself who will be missed so dearly. she has served not only as a deeply trusted and committed assistant to me, but as a mentor to many who have worked with her. i know i'm not the only one who will note her be absence
the popularity issue is a significant one. i would not ever confuse it with how people feel about us. it is a very different thing. >> in many places, we want friends. i have a three-part question -- what can we do to encourage a resolution or force a resolution to end the conflict? how likely is it we can do this successfully? what are the continued benefits of we succeed? >> i will ask bruce to begin. >> the israeli-palestinian conflict is extraordinarily difficult to sell. i have spent an inordinate amount of my life with israelis and palestinians trying to reason together and cannot claim any measure of success. that said, i think where we are today is substantially different than where we have been in the past. we know the contours' of agreement between israel and palestine. president clinton laid them out 12 years ago. there has been a lot of work since then. the question then becomes, what are we prepared to do to make that happen? that is a question of political will. there are huge obstacles on both sides. the forces of peace in the israeli camp and the palestinian camp have
side, us, us that have been trying to fight to reduce gun violence in this country. are we going to wait for another massacre? are we going to have this discussion six months, another year, 12, at 13, 20, 100 people die? we cannot wait any more. >> do your congress member carolyn mccarthy lost her husband 19 years ago and the long island rail road massacre. her son was gravely wounded. she's become a leading advocate for gun control as pro-gun politicians and lobbyists fall silent. there is a seismic shift that could lead to gun control legislation. we will ask her. then we look at the fight to save social security as negotiations of the so-called fiscal cliff intensified. >> i do believe the opportunity is there, the parameters of the deal are clear, the path to a compromise is clear. and he hopes the republicans will meet him on that path and do something that would be very good for the american people, for the middle class, and our economy. >> we will speak with arizona congressmember are raul grijalva on his opposition to president obama's plan to cut more from social securit
us from england, and to make us free. human rights day is about advancing equality and the american constitution as it has expanded over the years to include new groups of people and strike down barriers of race and gender, ethnic background, national origin. it is about the progress of human rights and equality, the noblest of causes for this nation and what brings us together in many ways as americans. the fight for freedom. the search for equality. and justice. and i want to talk about three specific ways that we can advance the cause of human rights in this chamber, in this session through measures that are before us. the first concerns human trafficking. i've been particularly interested in the rampant human trafficking problems on american bases abroad in places like iraq and afghanistan. victims are recruited from third countries like bangladesh and the philippines and charged exorbitant fees to travel to their work sites often misled about where they're going, what that are salaries will be and what their living conditions will be like. frequently their passports are confisc
's just 17. he knew he had to save the woman or die trying. when we met him later he tells us we had a feeling that she was still alive. we wanted to save her, to get her to a hospital. as he crawls closer, he can see her hand, her fingers shaking. cover him, cover him someone shouts. other fighters lay down cover fire. abdullah quickly ties the hose to her legs but unable to retreat. i said to myself, if i die, it's god's will that i die next to this woman he tells us. finally he makes a run for it. the rebels drag the woman back. >> the woman and her son were walking right down the street. the rebel fighters shouted at them to stay away, but too late. aleppo is crisscrossed with similar sniper alleys. some are known, but others do not reveal themselves until the first shot has been fired. despite abdullah's efforts, the woman dies. her son utterly distraught. don't die now, don't die today he pleads. answer me, mom. answer me. she's not dead. she's not dead he says as he collapses. abdullah is left wondering whether her life could have been saved if he'd reached her sooner. until r
and is using it without preserve -- reserve. but these rebel fighters in the suburbs of damascus are getting ready. they are training here for a future syrian army. cracks after liberating several areas and the total control of other areas, we have now shifted toward building a new foundation for the syrian national army. our main goal is to topple the regime, the alternative to take over -- but we must find an alternative to take over. >> their target is clear. the basic training lasts up to 45 days and then these men are dispatched to the battlefield. they know if they win, they will inherit their country. >> pakistan is marking the to anniversary of the death of former prime minister benazir bhutto. she was killed in a suicide attack at an election rally. no one has ever been convicted of her killing. thousands of people are gathering at the family mausoleum for a commemoration. thursday's events are expected to launch the political career of her son. elections are expected in the next. few next he is the co-chairman of the pakistan people's party along with his father. he is still too yo
twitter, a post a comment on facebook, or write us an e-mail. the theme of optimism or lack of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more
, christian. he used to send $15 a month to some little build israel organization. when my mother thought we didn't have enough money to send it, he sent it anyway. so always thought -- >> you didn't talk? >> i found out later. but i thought i would go with him, but he died before it worked out. so i was action on a trip in 2006, and i was in nuevo, a beach from which you can see saudi arabia, jordan and israel. year in egypt and i thought if i don't get myself there, i'm never going. i'm going to be like moses having seen the land that never entered. [laughter] and i made a reservation with the mileage i had. i decided instead of doing some dumb sure, i would rent an apartment for a few months and just take my work with me, since i write, i could do that, which i did. i did know anyone there. i didn't have one in. i have teams, i didn't know anybody. and as i said i ended up going during a war, but it wasn't even sure what was going to happen. i stayed because i love it and it didn't need to come back. i mean, i would come back to work every few months, but i met somebody good friends. i ha
the audience all of us have chapters in our lives, milestones. my important -- my most important chapter, he said, was a battle creek chapter. this is where i learned what democracy was all about. wherei learned what america wasl about. -- where i learned what america was all about. to impart any lessons about america on dan inouye would have been an honor but we may have taught him pales in comparison to what he tots. a few years ago danny told an audience that our greatness as a nation lies in part in our willingness to recognize the flaws in our past, including our treatment of japanese-americans, and our determination in whatever limited way we could to make amends. dan inouye served his country because of his dream of what we could be, a nation unbound by our all-too-human failings. he believed to his core that we are able to shed old prejudices and that our nation, de despiter flaws, shines with such bright promise that we can inspire remarkable service and sacrifice. a nation so great that those we treat with disdain or even hatred can respond with love that knows no limit. love is po
the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence
understands that we have a responsibility to use american power wisely, especially our military power. and he knows, from personal experience, that when we send our troops into harm's way, we must give them the sound strategy, a clear mission, and the resources that they need to get the job done. in an extraordinarily distinguished senate career and as chairman of the foreign relations committee, john has played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years. as we turn the page on a decade of war, he understands that we've got to harness all elements of american power and ensure that they're working together-- diplomatic and development, economic and political, military and intelligence-- as well as the power of our values which inspire so many people around the world. he is not going to need a lot of on-the-job training. he has earned the respect and trust of his senate colleagues, democrats and republicans. i think it's fair to say that few individuals know as many presidents and prime ministers, or grasp our foreign policies as firmly as john kerry. and this makes
, but it was my recommendation that created the u.s. holocaust memorial museum, the excision that led to that. i -- the commission that led to that. but during the clinton administration, i was ambassador to the european union, and i did as undersecretary all the holocaust negotiations. i negotiated $8 billion of compensation from the swiss, the germans, the austrians for slave labor, forced labor, looted art insurance, property restitution and the like. and here i'm really trying to look at this from the perspective of someone who's been a senior government official but also a leader in the jewish community. and that's why this book has been endorsed by both president perez and president clinton. >> stuart eizenstat, "the future of the jews." this is booktv on c-span2. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here's our prime time lineup for tonight. beginning at 7 p.m. eastern time, nobel prize-winning author talks about the history of africa and the challenges facing the continent today. then at 8:15, a look at presidential inaugurations throughout history. at 9 p.m. eastern "after words" with c
the attack. has been vocal against campaign -- vaccinations. >> they think the vaccine was used for identifying -- how this was used in case of locating osama bin laden. i think after that, this kind -- they became more targets of the taliban >> the government suspended at the vaccination campaign in karachi. this is not the first time they have targeted vaccination programs. in july, while local volunteer were shot and two volunteers were wounded. the government, along with un agencies, is on a campaign to immunize 34 million children under the age of 35. with health workers being attacked, eradicating the disease by the end of the year is looking very unlikely. certain communities and pakistan have long been suspicious of vaccination campaigns, particularly those run by foreign agencies over fears the vaccine may cause harm. with the taliban concerned these campaigns are a front for intelligence-gathering, many health experts fear not only more violence against their workers but a sharp increase in the number of young people contracting preventable diseases. >> the united stat
consideration. u.s. forces deported the plane this year. ospreys can fly twice as fast as the helicopter and four times as far before they need to refuel and they can transport three times the weight. the deployment of the osprey sparked protest in okinawa and elsewhere because of concerns about its safety record. ministry sources say they will consider public opinion and the cost of introducing the planes. japanese peacekeepers in the golan heights have begun to return home as their 16-yir-long mission nears its end. the first group of 33 members of the self-defense forces arrived at narita airport in tokyo on monday. government officials decided earlier this month to recall the peacekeepers earlier than planned. securing their safety had become difficult because of the civil war in syria. defense ministry officials say the remaining 14 members will wrap up their mission by mid-january. >>> japan first sent sdf personnel to the golan heights in 1996 as part of a united nations mission to monitor the cease-fire between syria and israel. members have been transporting supplies and providi
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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